Here’s why California scientists want neighborhood-by-neighborhood smog data – California News

Here’s why California scientists want neighborhood-by-neighborhood smog data – California News


Workshops are offered to those who want to participate in the community air pollution and weather monitoring program and live in the Claremont, Montclair, Chino and Riverside areas

Saturday, June 17, 10 a.m., at the Chino Basin Water Conservation District, 4594 San Bernardino St., Montclair

Tuesday, June 20 at 6 p.m. at the Chino Basin district

Saturday, June 24, at 10 a.m. at the Riverside-Corona Resource Conservation District, 4500 Glenwood Drive, Riverside.

For more information, call the Riverside-Corona Resource Conservation District at 951-683-7691, ext 223 or 207; or the Chino Basin district at 909-626-2711.

Southern California has long been the smog capital of the nation.

Most days from May through September, we endure unhealthful levels of ozone, a lung-searing gas that forms when emissions from vehicles, factories and other sources percolate in the sun-baked atmosphere.

But how can we better live with this malady in our midst?

Scientists with the international EarthWatch Institute and UC Riverside are collaborating with a handful of Long Beach residents and are now looking for Inland-area volunteers to help answer that question.

Using a grant from NASA, they are installing backyard ozone- and weather-monitoring stations to get a handle on how ozone exposure may differ from neighborhood to neighborhood, street to street and home to home.

Their quest is to learn how things like trees, proximity to parking lots, and elevation may affect a person’s ozone exposure at particular locations. Such information could then be used to better protect people from the…

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