San Francisco Bay View » Texas prisoner suffering stroke denied medical care, left for dead on cell floor for over 12 hours – California News

San Francisco Bay View » Texas prisoner suffering stroke denied medical care, left for dead on cell floor for over 12 hours – California News

by Jason Renard Walker, Deputy Minister of Labor, NABPP

Medical neglect and abuse kills prisoners, whether in California, where this art was created, or in Texas. – Art: Michael D. Russell, C-90473, HDSP D3-20, P.O. Box 3030, Susanville CA 96127

Many courts have held that a serious medical need is “one that is so obvious that even a lay person would easily recognize the necessity of a doctor’s attention.” See Brown v. Johnson, 387 F.3d 516, 522 (7th Circuit, 2008).

Being denied medical care at the Clements Unit Maximum Security Prison in remote Amarillo, Texas, is so common that the average prisoner here can expect to be denied some form of medical care during his stay. False claims of prisoners being disruptive during the visit or in disagreement with negligent care are some of the excuses medical staff use to deny needed assistance.

In other cases, we are outright denied care and not seen at all, but the returned sick call request will state that we were seen and our problem addressed. This happened to me when I tried to seek follow-up care for a food poisoning event on May 6, 2017, that affected around 50 of us. King and Grantham denied me care.

In a returned sick call I submitted on May 9, 2017, LVN Tammy Williams replied, “Reply addressed today.” The received date was May 11, 2017. In a second sick call I wrote on May 22, 2017, explaining that I hadn’t been seen, during the visit with RN Maria Carrizales, I was told to drink sips of water.

Many prisoners have suffered permanent damage and have even died due to this systemic indifference.

Being denied medical care at the Clements Unit Maximum Security Prison in remote Amarillo, Texas, is so…

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