Arkansas will witness first major eclipse in nearly a century this month – Arkansas News

Arkansas will witness first major eclipse in nearly a century this month – Arkansas News

Arkansas will witness first major eclipse in nearly a century this month

Sun, moon, earth set for rare allignment

travel writer Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism On Monday, Aug. 21, a total solar eclipse will take place. For about three hours, the sun, moon and Earth will be aligned in such a way that the moon will pass between the sun and the Earth, temporarily blocking out some or all of the sun—depending on where you’re watching from. Arkansas is slightly south of the “path of totality,” but we’re far closer than many places. This is the first total eclipse visible to the continental United States in 38 years, and it’s been nearly a hundred years since one of this magnitude was visible in Arkansas. The next total solar eclipse, in 2024, will cross Arkansas diagonally from the southwest corner to the northeast, placing a large swath of the state in the path of totality. This year’s eclipse offers a perfect opportunity for a dry run to see how you might enjoy the 2024 event in Arkansas.

No matter where you are in the state, you’ll be able to see the sun almost completely blocked by the moon — especially if you’re in the north and northeast, which lie closest to the path of totality and will see 95 to 97 percent coverage. According to a chart from the Central Arkansas Astronomical Society, the eclipse will begin at approximately 11:43 a.m. in the northwest corner of the state and be over by approximately 2:50 p.m. in the southeast, with peak totality occurring between 1:13 and 1:22 p.m. The cities of Piggott and Corning, which lie closest to the path of totality, will see the fullest eclipse, at 97% totality; El…

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