Hoping to improve graduation rates, Cal State University makes abrupt shift in remedial programs – California News

Hoping to improve graduation rates, Cal State University makes abrupt shift in remedial programs – California News


The California State University system is ditching its remedial programs.

Recent data have shown that requiring students with weak English and/or math skills to take noncredit remedial classes before being allowed to enroll in regular courses may not be very effective.

On Wednesday, Aug. 2, CSU Chancellor Timothy White issued an executive order that essentially restructures the way the system’s 23 universities will work on bringing lower-skilled students up to speed. The new approach is designed to help students move through their college careers more quickly and increase CSU graduation rates. and dovetails with the system’s Graduation 2025 initiative to increase six-year graduation rates to 70 percent.

This dovetails with the system’s Graduation 2025 initiative to increase six-year graduation rates to 70 percent.

The order calls for an end to the standing practice of giving assessment tests to incoming freshmen and eliminates the remedial courses that students who tested poorly were required to take. About 40 percent of incoming freshmen were required to take such courses.

The changes will be implemented for students enrolling as freshmen in fall 2018.

Students needing extra help will instead take one-unit supplemental courses — at the same time they are enrolled in regular classes — and may be required to get tutoring or other types of assistance. Basic courses geared toward low-performing students may also incorporate additional material to address those students’ needs.

Nathan Evans, chief of staff at the CSU Chancellor’s Office in Long Beach, said the new order represents a major departure from a system…

click here to read more.

Share this post

Post Comment