Study On CTE Has Many Football Coaches, Players Reassessing The Sport – Connecticut News

Study On CTE Has Many Football Coaches, Players Reassessing The Sport – Connecticut News

Joe Linta played football at Yale before making a living as an NFL agent and football coach at Hamden Hall. Yet he wonders if it is worth it for his son to play.

A recent study by Boston University on 202 former football players found much evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The study stopped short of proving the condition, a progressive degenerative disease of the brain, is prevalent in all football players. Yet it once again raised concern.

“My son T.J. [a quarterback at Brown] is in a game against Columbia last year and he got whacked hard after someone missed a block,” Linta said. “He fell hard and his head whiplashed back into the turf. He wasn’t throwing up or anything, but he clearly had a moment of memory loss and dizziness for maybe 45 minutes to an hour. It took him nearly a day to recover.

“As a parent, I would look at that and say [football’s] not really worth it and, God forbid, if he has one more [blow] of any significance, I’m going to have the conversation with him about whether it is really worth it.

“He’s an example of a kid who is going to go out in the world and have opportunities for jobs. Is it really worth it? But it’s something he wants more than anything and I am supportive of him – to an extent.”

The study confirmed that the high percentage of brains donated by families of players with multiple concussions or troubling symptoms before they died had CTE.

Football is a collision sport and vicious hits have been glorified. There have been famous, defining hits, such as Chuck Bednarik on Frank Gifford in 1960, or many on Oakland QB Kenny…

click here to read more.

Share this post

Post Comment