1930s yearbooks spotlight education during segregation, part III | News – California News

1930s yearbooks spotlight education during segregation, part III | News – California News

When Rich Medel unearthed a pair of his father’s elementary school annuals from the 1930s, he uncovered a rarely seen slice of Carpinteria history. His father, Lucio Medel, was born in 1920 and attended school during Carpinteria’s ugly era of segregation. Children of Mexican descent all went to Aliso School in the 1920s through 1947, while white students attended other campuses.

This “History of the Fourth and Fifth Grades” appeared in the 1931 yearbook:

We started the year by fixing up our room. First we painted the library table and two small chairs. We painted them blue and trimmed them in orange. The table was so bright it made the rest of the room look dull, so we asked Mr. Lintz for some varnish. We varnished as much of the woodwork as we could reach. Then we did our desks and Miss Flacheneker’s. Mr. Lintz had some men paint the wall a cream color.

At Halloween we had a party. We bobbed for apples, played other games and then had candy, cookies and suckers. We all helped to decorate the room. Just before Christmas we had another party. There was a tree with candy and presents for everyone. Our ten Girl Scouts had on their new uniforms for the first time that day. On Valentine’s Day we have the biggest box in the room.

We had lots of baseball games this year with Miss Robbins’ and Mrs. Perry’s boys and girls. The big people always beat us and we won the games with the smaller children, but sometimes they were very close.

We had one boy in the track meet, Joe Munoz. He took third place in his class in high jump….

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